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I was planning to go to Picocon today, but I didn't make it; a… - John C. Kirk — LiveJournal

Feb. 18th, 2006

04:47 pm

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From:pozorvlak
Date:February 19th, 2006 05:43 pm (UTC)

Sleeping bags

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I wouldn't be too hasty to throw the old one away - when I was down in London recently, I slept in Nyder's dad's sleeping bag, which is at least forty years old and the most comfortable sleeping bag I've ever experienced.

And you know Chip-and-PIN is a dodge by the banks to shift responsibility on to you, right?
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From:johnckirk
Date:February 19th, 2006 05:51 pm (UTC)

Re: Sleeping bags

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Regarding the sleeping bag, the main problem is that I haven't washed it in a long time, and there are no instructions inside it. It's got a weird metallic inner lining, so I don't know whether that means "dry clean only" or "don't dry clean it, whatever you do!", and guessing wrong would probably result in it disintegrating. So, spending 20 quid on a new one seems like a reasonable price, if that averages out at £1/year. (There's also my Sisyphus style quest to reduce the amount of stuff in my flat, so I'm trying to reduce duplication where I can.) Thanks for the tip, though.

As for Chip-and-PIN, I haven't done as much reading through the terms and conditions as I probably ought to, so I don't know how the liability issues work out. For now, I'd assume that if the bank says "You have to use your PIN" and the shop says "We don't have a PIN machine yet" then that can't make me liable for it. More generally, the bank were very helpful when my card got cloned a few years ago, so I'd expect the same thing to happen if someone faked a duplicate card/PIN.
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From:pozorvlak
Date:February 19th, 2006 06:50 pm (UTC)

Re: Sleeping bags

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AIUI, you should never dry-clean sleeping bags - think noxious fumes invading your brain while you sleep. Washing it at 40 should be OK. I have two sleeping bags, but they serve different purposes - a thick one for camping/lending out and a thin one for sleeping on people's floors, which is also much more portable.

Chip-and-PIN: I've heard that if someone fakes a duplicate card/PIN, the banks intend to turn around and say "You can't have taken adequate care regarding PIN security, Sir, not our fault" and stick you with the bill. Dunno how true that is (and it would be a major customer-relations downer if it were).
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From:sammoore
Date:February 20th, 2006 09:43 am (UTC)

Re: Sleeping bags

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In my old job I had nearly 100 sleeping bags to care for.

Those that were synthetic all washed fine, as previously said, at 40-50 degrees C. Down bags are a different matter. If you aren't confident, send a down one off to a specialist company (not any old dry cleaners). I have the contact details if you want them.

The bigger the washing machine the better. When I lived in London, I used a laundrette. I'm lucky in that we have an industrial machine on site now.

Contrary to perceived opinion, tumbledrying is good for sleeping bags. A *cool* tumble dry, on its own, for as long as possible is ideal. If you put two or three tennis balls in the machine with it, they help it to "fluff up" and make it warm again. Again, the larger the machine the better.

The ideal way keep your bag clean is to make or buy a liner to use inside it that can be washed like a normal sheet. This is standard practice for down bags but also works with synthetic. We had a set of liners where I used to work and we only washed the sleeping bags once or twice a year.

Hope this is of some interest.

Sam
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